The Coffee Party

There’s currently two manifestations of the emerging Coffee Party on Facebook.

One manifestation is Join the Coffee Party, a grass-roots movement focused on organizing a political voice to make the changes we’d like to see made through reasonable debate, research, and voting. With a desire to enable discussion, as opposed to disrupting it, the Coffee Party has begun organization of State chapters throughout the nation.

The second manifestation, which I believe took a place on Facebook first, appears to have the sophistication of a poo-flinging monkey but certainly accomplishes a firm statement about what they are for and against. This group has taken the name”The Coffee Party” and has already received scathing reviews from a few Tea Party bloggers who seemed insulted by the “eye for an eye” approach of the group. Despite having over 2,000 members, this group seems to accomplish very little in the way of organization and action but is a well for insulting photographs of “conservative” pundits and Republican political leaders. Without knowing for sure, it seemed to have been formed in jest, only to mock the Tea Party and the attitude found therein. For obvious reasons, this paragraph will be my only mention of that group in association to the actual Coffee Party.

Join the Coffee Party
also has a presence on Twitter: JoinCoffeeParty and CoffeePartyUSA. The Twitter hashtag #coffeeparty can also be used. The Coffee Party is developing non-partisan membership, a collection of people who are both feeling bewildered that logic and reasonableness requires a movement and feeling determined to work together for civil, open discussion to accomplish a future with which we all can live. For all the individuals who feel the Tea Party doesn’t represent them but they wish to act collectively to speak, listen and be heard in full cooperation and participation with our country’s government, the Coffee Party is now here.

The Coffee Party name was not chosen entirely in satire, although there is an undeniable reactionary element to the choice based on the existing Tea Party. The Tea Party chose its name in the spirit of the Boston Tea Party, where the Sons of Liberty organized in dramatic protest against the outrageous Tea Act of 1773. I’d like to add a note of interest that even after England had repealed the Tea Act with the Taxation of Colonies Act of 1778, the colonies were not satisfied and continued to revolt.

The Coffee Party is a bit more symbolic. Before the Sons of Liberty took to dramatic protests and insatiable demands, they and other important men of the Revolution sat in a coffeehouse called the Green Dragon Tavern in Boston, MA. In the dimly lit coffeehouse, they had open discussions and organization of ways to create a new nation, free of the problems they experienced as colonists of Britain. Even as rash and bold as throwing tea overboard a ship may seem, the Sons of Liberty were reasonable men who debated with open minds and carefully planned a path to freedom. They did not prevent discussion or shut out ideas.

Both the Tea Party and the Coffee Party are romantic concepts, overshadowed by the momentous men and actions that these names are meant to reference, so it is important that members don’t drift to these attractive concepts with a feeling of identification with the original Revolution. We are so far from that today. I joined the Coffee Party knowing that I’m not sitting in a dimly lit coffeehouse exploring the strategic options of overthrowing the oppressive British crown and forming a Republic to represent The People. I am The People in a working Republic government that can only represent me if I speak up and vote.

Editing to Add:

The official Coffee Party now has several local chapters with Fan Pages on Facebook. Join the Coffee Party keeps track of these pages in the “Favorite Pages” box on the Wall tab. See if there is a local chapter in your area and, if not, you can help start one by joining the discussion!

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